Rule of Law News

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  • Polygamy has been called a “breeding ground” for corruption, and blamed for the spread of corruption in, for example, South Africa, Ghana, Nigeria, and South Sudan. But the empirical evidence to support this claim is "very weak," according to Global Anticorruption Blog contributitng author Katie King. In a recent article, King reflects on the purported link between cultural practices and...

  • Does security mean defense: tanks and barbed-wire fences? Or can it mean building relationships, confronting inequalities and recognising each other's humanity? In a presentation at TEDxExeter, peacebuilder Celia McKeon weighs in on the meaning of "security" in the context of 15 years documenting peace processes in the post-Yugoslav states, Colombia, and Northern Ireland.

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  • Currently, there is often a debate over whether we must give up rights to have security. For example, extraordinary renditions, mass surveillance and extra-judicial executions are just some of the most well-known security operations which have violated human rights. In a recent blog, Nils Muizneiks notes a key reason: current systems of oversight of security services were and remain largely...

  • Over the past few weeks, Justice in Conflict blog has covered issues pertaining to international justice and accountability in Syria and Iraq, including the wisdom of a United Nations Security Council referral of the Islamic State to the International Criminal Court (ICC). This post continues that conversation, and considers whether a referral of ISIS to the ICC would be useful in achieving...

  • In a blog for Justice in Conflict, author Mark Kersten weighs in on the FIFA corruption scandal with a timely look at two of the football federation's previous, very public encounters with the international criminal justice system, "one in which football’s fiefdom came face to face with a notorious perpetrator of mass atrocities and another when FIFA (almost) joined hands with the former chief...

  • Twelve years ago, Portugal eliminated criminal penalties for drug users. Since then, those caught with small amounts of marijuana, cocaine or heroin go unindicted and possession is a misdemeanor on par with illegal parking. Experts are pleased with the results. In an article originally published in Der Spiegel, author Wiebke Hollersen charts the course of decriminalization through the...

  • Both Liberia and Timor-Leste have made significant progress in personal security, despite starting from a low baseline and suffering prolonged periods of conflict. This animation from Development Progress looks at the key lessons to be learned from their stories of progress.

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  • "The chequered history of the Afghanistan Local Police (ALP) suggests further expansion of such forces would be a mistake, but an abrupt halt to the program would give insurgents a military edge, and ex-fighters might also be drawn to banditry and other forms of lawlessness if not carefully reintegrated into society or the ANSF," writes Crisis Group in a June 2015 report. "New policies are...

  • Hosted by the  Igarapé Institute in Brazil, a new global homicide monitor presents counts and estimates of global homicide over the period 2000-2014, and is intended to provoke reflection and stimulate debate. The Monitor reports 437,000 homicides in 2012, the last year for which global estimates are available. A small number of countries account for a disproportionately large share of the...

  • "There is a clear need for more transparency and debate on the different types of assistance programmes, with clarity on their objectives and their approaches," writes Mike Downes for ISSAT-DCAF. "It is incumbent on different government departments to make a greater effort to ensure coherence when it comes to these different policy agendas. Yet few governments supporting development abroad...

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