Rule of Law News

160 Results
  • In a multipart series for the New York Times, investigative reporter Ian Urbina explores the final frontier of international law - the world’s oceans, a wild west like environment characterized by weak rules, little oversight, and violence on the high seas. Urbina takes readers on a journey through the perspective of seafarers globally, and some of the human rights and labor abuses they face...

  • As interventions that aim to have an impact on social norms become more appealing to donors as a means of achieving development outcomes--"cultures" of rule of law, for example--the academic community is under growing pressure to refine and agree on definitions. In a post for the World Bank Publicsphere Blog, contributor David Jodrell weighs in on the "normative effect," and four key ways...

  • Law enforcement can play a critical role in helping connect runaway youth and their families to services, preventing future runaway incidents, victimization, or involvement in criminal activity. In an article for Status Offense Reform Center, Chief Harry Earle of the Gloucester Township Police explains the importance of officers' understanding that finding a missing adolescent is just the...

  • In an article for the Institute for Inclusive Security, author Meressa Kahsu examines developments towards the inclusion of police reforms in peace support operations. She argues that getting policing right is at the heart of peace support operations, and therefore the African Union should sufficiently staff the policing department. In this light, the Police Strategic Support Group is a key...

  • Why does organized crime relate to the work of democracy support in fragile affected contexts? How can organized crime affect post-conflict recovery and reconstruction? In particular, how can it be a challenge to state building? A recent article from International IDEA reviews several interesting conclusions from the June conference "Organized Crime in Fragile Contexts," including how...

  • The Centre for Security Governance (CSG) has just published its third SSR 2.0 Brief. This brief, written by Dean Piedmont, director for the Peacebuilding, Reintegration and Stabilization Group, examines the DDR-CVE nexus. As this brief shows, there is a need for a new, innovative policy framework for DDR that better equips the concept to address the DDR-CVE challenge. A paradigm shift in...

  • Thirteen years after Sierra Leone's long civil war came to an end, its broken institutions and weak development indicators continue to impact on the lives of its people. A new film from Governance & Justice Group follows two Sierra Leonean paralegals, Marvelle and Victoria, as they navigate their way through the criminal justice system, helping answer the question: why is the number of...

  • A panel of independent experts recently published an exhaustive and "hotly awaited" report on the future of UN Peacekeeping. The panel was lead by Jose Ramos Horta, the Nobel Laureate and former president of East Timor–a country where peacekeeping played a key role in its turbulent early ears. In a new webcast for UN Dispatch, Richard Gowan, a columnist at World Politics review and an editor...

  • Nicole Ball is a Senior Fellow at the Centre for International Policy (CIP), a member of the DCAF Advisory Board and a Strategic Adviser to ISSAT. In this interview recorded by ISSAT during the Africa Forum on SSR in November 2014, she urges to refocus on democratic governance issues, as well as on several key gaps that still need to be bridged within SSR programmes designed by external actors...

  • No one would argue the law should be subservient to politics when confronting domestic criminality, so why should this be the case for international crimes? In an article for OpenGlobalRights, Kip Hale (Director, ABA International Criminal Court Project) writes, "to prevent and punish atrocity crimes, the law and politics should be mutually reinforcing, and their operation must be sequenced in...

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